Friday, February 16, 2018

M0026: Leo et Vulpes Territa


M0025 - M0026 + English - M0027

26. Leo et Vulpes Territa. Vulpes, cum numquam leonem vidisset, postquam olim forte in eum incidit, primo quidem intuitu ita perterrefacta est ut parum abfuerit quin periret. Rursus autem eodem obviam reperto, tunc etiam, sed non ut antea, timuit. Tertio demum ipsum conspicata, audax ita fuit ut, accedens, cum eo colloqueretur. Quae terribilia sunt, consuetudo blandiora reddit.

Vulpes et Leo (De Familiaritate)

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M0026 = Perry010. Source: De Furia 7. This is Perry 10. Compare the story of the people and the camel, #144.

26. The Lion and the Frightened Fox. The fox, who had never seen a lion, when she first encountered him by chance, at the first sight was so thoroughly terrified that she all but perished on the spot. The second time, however, that she ran into him, she was frightened again, but not so much as before. Finally, the third time that she saw him, she was so bold as to come up and hold a conversation with him. Things which are terrifying are rendered more agreeable by familiarity.

4 comments:

  1. Conspicio conspicor. Such near identical or identical deponent and non deponent forms are both a blessing and a curse. Is there a word for them? In writing I call them dep/nondep.

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  2. Have you had a chance to study Greek? Greek has active, passive AND middle voices... and seeing the Greek middle is a great way to get some insight into the Latin deponents.

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  3. I plan to. I love the Iliad in English prose, but did not enjoy the Aeneid in Latin. I don't like poetry by the length of syllable. Do you know a good prose translation? For Homer I have the Rieu translation. In about a year I hope to try.

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  4. I'm not a fan of Virgil at all, but Homer is different: Homer is true oral epic, true oral composition. Personally, I love it. Do you know about Lord's book on oral composition? It is really fascinating stuff, the key to Homer (and why Virgil is totally different): Lord's Singer of Tales

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