Friday, August 13, 2010

PDF Copies of the book - Free!

To distribute this book as widely as possible, in addition to the printed copies available from Lulu.com ($19.95 paperback), I have made a complete PDF version of the book available for free download here. Please download a copy: the fables want to be read! :-)


Even if you have a printed copy of the book, you might find it useful to have a PDF copy as well:
  • You can use the PDF version to print out selected pages (or the whole book), with room for notes.
  • You can read the fables and notes together, using two copies of the PDF in two different windows.
  • You can search the PDF for words and phrases.
  • You can use a PDF viewer (such as GoodReader) to read the book on your iPad or iPhone.

What’s the catch? Free copies?
There is no catch: my goal in creating this book is to reach as many readers as I can. So, I am glad to be able to share copies of the book with anyone who wants one. Teachers: please encourage your students to get their own free PDF copy of the book!

Thank you, Oklahoma! I earn my living as an instructor at the University of Oklahoma, which allows me to devote my summers to Aesop and the Latin fables. So, if you are enjoying a free PDF copy of this book, you can thank President David Boren of the University of Oklahoma and the College of Arts & Sciences Online Course Program.

If you have suggestions or comments about how I can make this website more useful to you in your exploration of the fables, please let me know!


27 comments:

  1. Thank you, Laura Gibbs. You are very generous!

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  2. gratias multas tibi agimus omnes!

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  3. Thanks, everybody, for your comments! If you have suggestions about how to make the book and/or the PDF and/or this website more useful to you in your exploration of the fables, please let me know! :-)

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  4. Gratias tibi ago, Dominus benedicat te!

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  5. One thing that might improve the use (and circulation) of this already wonderful and generous collection, might be to attach an explicit license to the free version of the text. This would make it clearer under what terms this text is freely circulated. (Even though you have already made clear that the Latin texts are in the public domain, this would make it easier, for example, for a researcher to copy the texts into a database for linguistic and statistical processing.)

    For instance, look at the various licenses available under Creative Commons. Since you're also selling print versions of this book, you might want to specify a non-commercial license.

    Either way, this free download is already a great example to scholars everywhere.

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  6. Thanks for your comment, Gabriel - that is something I pondered a lot before doing this. Since the text is definitely NOT for scholarly purposes, I don't see it being used for a database (I edited the texts with teachers and students in mind - although it would be great if some serious digitization efforts went on based on the same original sources that I used) - and with Creative Commons licenses, I think I would have a hard time retracting the license if I did find a publisher who wants to publish this book under terms that we would negotiate to our mutual satisfaction (for example, I would insist absolutely on my right to give away the PDF copy of the text-only book, even if I agreed to give exclusive book printing rights to a publisher who would agree, say, to undertake the expense of adding illustrations to the printed text, hint hint to any publishers out there!!!). I'm ambivalent about that at this point, but I didn't want to overpromise something that I wasn't sure I could stick to over the long run!

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  7. Aha, Gabriel, I see you are Gabriel from AWBG - fantastic! That blog is such an amazing resource. Would it be appropriate to announce the Mille Fabulae there...? It's not a book for scholars exactly - but it could have good scholarly repercussions. At least, that is my hope! :-)

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  8. Thank you. Merci.

    Sandra from France

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  9. Thanks a lot! I am a college student and really lOVE those fables. They are full of wisdom!

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  10. Thank you Laura - I fancy myself your greatest fan but I am well aware there are many of us. Thank you again. Scott Utley LA CA USA

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  11. It is always so nice to hear from you, Scott! I keep chugging away here - the world of GoogleBooks just has me completely enraptured with all the projects I would like to do! :-)

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  12. Hi, in my blog you will find more than 600 latin language links. visit it and tell me your opinion.

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  13. Hi, Laura, just wanted to say thank you :)

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  14. I may just be repeating what others have said, but I want to say I am very grateful to you to give us the opportunity to have such a treasure.

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  15. My pleasure! I had so much fun on that project summer before last... and this summer I have a new project on distich poetry that will lead to a new book (I hope!) - here's the blog I am working on right now with the draft materials: Disticha Latina.

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  16. Thank you, Jonas! This summer's book will be ready in August! :-)

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  17. Thank you! I may soon be teaching/facilitating a beginners class in Latin, for which I feel wholly unqualified. I have been looking for some very short, simple reading material of a sort different than what is found in Wheelock's. this is just what I was hoping to find.

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  18. Great, Sean, I am so glad if it can be helpful. I also have a book of short Latin poets - Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems - which you and your students can download, and some Fabulae Faciles here. Have fun! Proverbs, little poems, tiny stories - it's all good! :-)

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  19. Excellent! Can't wait to share with my Year 7 students!

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  20. Lousy at Latin, but still attempting . . . thankyou for both the blog and your PDFs, but *ahem* any chance one day of an epub version? PDF on the PC works fine, but PDF on the eReader is a nightmare of tineyteensey text (it being the nature of PDFs!)

    Your blog with its background and sayings keeps me - if not successfully endevouring - at least valiantly trying!

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  21. Hi Ruth, alas, until I am doing this for real (and not just as a hobby in my spare time), I cannot manage all the different formats people would like to have. What I have offered here is text-based PDF (not page images), so you might be able to find a PDF-to-ebook converter out there, since the PDF is all text, no images, nothing complicated. You can also do a highlight-all copy-and-paste to get the text out of it, and then paste that text into any document editor you want, and output any format you want. Whatever people want to do to reformat the document for their convenience is fine with me!

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  22. Thank you! I am sure my students will enjoy listening to your translations.

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  23. As one who has been learning Latin for several years on my own, I thank you for this wonderful resource and appreciate the time, patience and energy that it must have taken to bring this work to life. The structure allows for daily translating to keep one's progress moving steadily forward. Again, thank you for this blessing.

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  24. Thank you for your comment, Gregg - I am so glad it is useful! Did you see that Justin Bailey has been putting up audio for the fables? You can find that here at his site:
    Indwelling Language: Latin Audio Fables

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